What is it?

It is sometimes necessary to remove a tooth or molar. This is called a tooth extraction.

Guidelines for at home

Swelling

There may be swelling for 48 hours, usually more during the last 24 hours. Afterwards, the swelling should not increase and will begin to decrease. If the swelling increases, please contact your physician. To minimise swelling, use ice packs the first two days.

Bleeding

The wound may have some seeping drainage the first 48 hours. If there is bleeding, it is recommended that you rinse your mouth with ice water. Afterwards, place a thick compress up against the wound. Bite down on the compress for 20 minutes. The bleeding should stop on its own. If the bleeding does not stop, it is best to contact your physician.

Pain

The pain can fluctuate quite a bit and last from a few days to a week. Your physician will give you pain medication, which you may take for as long as they are needed (usually less than ten days).

Food

You may eat after the anaesthesia has worn off. A soft and bland diet is recommended. A bland diet is necessary in order to prevent bleeding during the 48 hours after the procedure.

Sutures

The wound has been sewn shut with absorbable (digestible) sutures. The sutures normally disappear on their own. If the sutures are still present and bothersome after two weeks, they may be removed.

Sleeping

We recommend that you sleep in a semi-sitting position. This will minimise swelling.

Sports

For most procedures, it is not recommended to engage in sports for approximately ten days.

Brushing your teeth

You may brush your teeth afterwards, but avoid the place where the procedure was performed for the first few days.

Smoking/Alcohol

It is recommended that you not smoke or drink alcohol for three days after the procedure due to the increased risk of bleeding and infection.

Centres and specialist areas

Stomatology and Maxillofacial Surgery

Latest publication date: 04/05/2021
Supervising author: Dr Borghgraef Kristin